I.D. MAGAZINE, USA, APR 2002
INTERIORS
REINVENTING THE WERKPLACE
text: Tricia Hill

Last year, Berlin-based design firm Martini, Meyer (www.martinimeyer.com) was commissioned by postproduction house Das Werk AG to create an environment that would serve the needs of its clients and staff, many of whom routinely spend as many as 30 hours non-stop on the job.

One of the project challenges was that the environment had to address the different human needs that result from the intense time commitment.” There are so many emotional, physical and spatial needs going on in one room,” says Alexandra Martini, who partnered with Henrike Meyer in 2000 to form Martini, Meyer. “You have to serve the people entirely, more than just having good technique.”

To satilfy the project’s practical requirements, the firm created “long medium short endless,” a design concept that plays with the dimensions of space and time in an abstract way. For example, what looks somewhat like a padded child’s playroom – brightly colored, upholstered walls that flow into furniture extensions and a seemingly endless wooden bar that curves up the wall into a flat panel on the ceiling – is actually a highly functional workspace.

The suites are wired so clients can work on a laptop of view the technican’s progress on highly calibrated monitors integrated into sections of the wall The concert also takes workspace comfort to a higher lever by providing well designed lounges, meeting rooms and workstations with modular elements to suit the tastes of employees and clients. For Martini, Meyer – whose clients include DaimlerChrysler and Habitat UK – the goal is to seamlessly combine aesthetics with function. Martini says, “It’s good if a client comes in and knows he’s in (a place) where somebody thought about the environment.”

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I.D. MAGAZINE, USA, APR 2002

I.D. MAGAZINE, USA, APR 2002